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Easiest French Crêpes

Easiest French Crêpes


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These French crêpes are light and thin with a slightly sweet batter that can be tasty by itself or complement a filling. Fill with anything sweet: marmalade, maple syrup, Nutella, powdered sugar, fresh fruit and berries, melted chocolate, etc. While mixing the batter, feel free to experiment with pinches of spices like nutmeg or cinnamon, or a couple drops of vanilla extract.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes

Servings: makes 6 crêpes

Ingredients:
1 cup flour
1 tablespoon sugar
1 cup + 2 tablespoons milk (whole, 2% or skim)
2 tablespoons butter, melted + extra for the pan
2 eggs

Directions:
1. Mix the flour and sugar in a medium sized bowl.
2. Add the milk and whisk until smooth. (Tip: If you heat the milk in the microwave for 1-2 minutes, the clumps will dissolve faster.)
3. Add the 2 tablespoons of melted butter and whisk until smooth.
4. Add the eggs and whisk until the batter is smooth.

Photo by Francisca Gomez

5. Add butter to the pan and let it melt. Add as much butter as necessary to keep the crêpes from sticking to the pan.
6. Use a soup ladle or a 1/3 measuring cup to pour batter on the pan. The crêpes should be thin, so pour just enough for the batter to spread all over the pan.
7. When the batter looks ready (not runny, tiny bubbles, crisp edges) flip the crêpe with a spatula.
8. Let the other side cook for another 1-2 minutes. Each side should be golden, with some brown spots. (Tip: if the pan is non-stick, the brown spots will not appear because there is less butter on the pan.)

Photo by Francisca Gomez

9. Repeat steps 5-8 until all the batter is used up.
10. Add fillings or toppings to taste.

Photo by Francisca Gomez

The post Easiest French Crêpes appeared first on Spoon University.


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


The Traditional French Crepes Recipe

Here is my favorite French crepes (crêpes) recipe! Today is la Chandeleur a.k.a. Candlemas and is the day where most French households will eat crepes (a cousin of the American pancake but much thinner). This Catholic religious holiday is exactly 40 days after Christmas, but it also has origins in an older pre-Christian holiday celebrating the harvest and marking the midway point of winter.

Nowadays, la Chandeleur is mostly known as the day of the crêpes. It’s a day when families and friends all make crêpes and enjoy them together. And there are certain very particular ways to eat your crepes, according to French tradition. First, you’re supposed to eat crepes at dinnertime instead of breakfast. And along with the sweet or savory crepes, it’s traditional to drink cider out of a round bowl instead of a glass.

Crepes are a very common food in France and are not only easy to make but can be served any way you want. You can enjoy them for breakfast, dinner, brunch, dessert, or as a snack. But do you know the difference between une crêpe and une galette?


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